European Commission president leads EU tributes to Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh

British Queen Elizabeth II's consort for more than 70 years passes away aged 99.

By Martin Banks

Martin Banks is a senior reporter at the Parliament Magazine

09 Apr 2021

Ursula von der Leyen has led EU tributes following the announcement of the death of Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh.

Prince Philip, Queen Elizabeth II's husband, died aged 99, Buckingham Palace announced on Friday.

Reacting, von der Leyen said, “I am saddened to hear of the passing of Prince Philip.

“I would like to extend my sincere sympathy to Her Majesty the Queen, the Royal Family and the people of the United Kingdom on this very sad day.”

Further comment came from former Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier who said: “I am saddened to hear of the passing of His Royal Highness Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh.

“Sincere condolences to Queen Elizabeth and the Royal Family. My solidarity to all the people.”

“I would like to extend my sincere sympathy to Her Majesty the Queen, the Royal Family and the people of the United Kingdom on this very sad day” European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen

Similar sentiments came from European Parliament President, David Sassoli, who said, “My sincere condolences for the passing of the Duke of Edinburgh, Prince Philip. My thoughts are with the Queen, the Royal Family and the people of the United Kingdom.”

Austrian chancellor Sebastian Kurz said: “I extend my sincere condolences to Her Majesty the Queen, the Royal Family and the people of the United Kingdom after the passing of His Royal Highness Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh.”

Irish premier Micheal Martin, Scott Morrison, the prime minister of Australia, and Indian leader Narendra Modi were among other world leaders to pay their respects.

Speaking at Downing Street, UK prime minister Boris Johnson said that the Duke had "earned the affection of generations here in the United Kingdom, across the Commonwealth, and around the world".

The prince married Princess Elizabeth in 1947, five years before she became Queen.

In March, the Duke left King Edward VII's hospital in central London after a month long stay for treatment.

He underwent a procedure for a pre-existing heart condition at another London hospital - St Bartholomew's.

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