ESMO: Pancreatic Cancer: A Guide for Patients

Written by The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) on 13 November 2014 in Press Release
Press Release

Guides for Patients are designed to assist patients, their relatives and caregivers to better understand the nature of different types of cancer and evaluate the best available treatment choices.

What is pancreatic cancer?

Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which abnormal cells appear in the tissue of the pancreas. The pancreas is made up of two different kinds of tissue with different functions: the exocrine pancreas, which secretes enzymes into the digestive tract, which help to break down fats and proteins, and the endocrine pancreas, which secretes glucagon and insulin into the bloodstream in order to control blood sugar levels. In most cases, pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine pancreas.

Beyond a definition of pancreatic cancer, in this guide for patients you will find answers to questions such as:

  • Is pancreatic cancer frequent?
  • What causes pancreatic cancer?
  • How is pancreatic cancer diagnosed?
  • What is it important to know to get the optimal treatment?
  • What are the treatment options?
  • What are the possible side effects of the therapies?
  • What happens after the treatment?

This guide for patients has been prepared in collaboration with Anti-Cancer Fund as a service to patients, to help patients and their relatives better understand the nature of Pancreatic Cancer and appreciate the best treatment choices available according to the subtype of Pancreatic Cancer. ESMO recommends that patients ask their doctors about what tests or types of treatments are needed for their type and stage of disease.

Download files

EN | Pancreatic Cancer: Guide for Patients

EL | Pancreatic Cancer: Guide for Patients – Greek

ES | Cáncer de Páncreas: Guía para Pacientes

FR | Cancer du Pancréas: Guide pour les Patients

NL | Alvleesklierkanker: Gids voor Patiënten

Related links

ESMO Guides for Patients: Disclaimer and declaration of interest

ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines: Gastrointestinal Cancers

ESMO Cancer Patient Working Group

About the author

The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) is the leading European professional organisation committed to advancing the specialty of medical oncology and promoting a multidisciplinary approach to cancer treatment and care.
 ESMO’s mission is to advance cancer care and cure through fostering and disseminating good science that leads to better medicine and determines best practice.

The ESMO international community counts more than 9,000 oncology professionals sharing best practices and the latest know-how in cancer treatment and care.

ESMO’s scientific journal, Annals of Oncology, ranks among the top 10 clinical oncology journals worldwide.

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